AWS

American Welding Society

The year was 1919. Historically, an important one. It was the dawn of prohibition, a year of scandals and the year Babe Ruth left Boston to play for the New York Yankees. It also happened to be the dawn of the roaring’ twenties, a decade of financial proliferation for America.

It also marked new wars fought around the world and by the world. On the Stateside, an organization of America’s preeminent welders was forming. Partly due to the demand for skilled workers to craft military equipment, and mostly because until 1919, there was little standardization in manufacturing and producing military weapons didn’t have much room for failure.

Since World War I, the American Welding Society has been on the forefront of modern construction. As Ensel Ford took over his father’s motorcar company and other brands began to pop up, the need for safer bridges, passageways and buildings for these companies to work in flourished. No longer was haphazard work acceptable. Welders were now a mandated industry and the American Welding Society would spearhead growth and regulate standards for years to come.

Within a year, the AWS had gone from modest roots in New York to attracting more than 200 members across the nation. Eight new offices were set up throughout the country by 1922 and the society introduced a journal which became the vade mecum for members everywhere.

AWS

American Welding Society

As the membership continued to grow, the society moved its head offices to Florida and instituted a curriculum of training that led to the formation of numerous industry-leading certifications. These certifications were immediately considered the pinnacle of education and training for the welding industry and those skilled enough to achieve them would soon find their credentials were recognized around the world. With this success, the AWS began opening test facilities and accrediting ones that met their strict criteria. They offered endorsement certifications in multiple disciplines and continued to create a reputation as the leading society of welders anywhere in the world.

To find out more about the American Welding Society, visit their website at www.aws.org or contact our office to learn more about their programs.

until next week,

Bonnie Pankratz

bonnie@axisinspection.com